Psychological Reflections on Online Academic Dynamics

Online communications have become extremely popular in the recent times
thanks to technological advancement especially with regard to computers,
mobile telephony and the internet. Indeed, research shows that about 66%
of the world population has an online presence or rather use the
internet once in a while (Wiederhold, 2012). Having participated in the
online academic activities, my psychological state was primarily
influenced by the group interactions that the online classrooms allowed
for. Indeed, students at the online classrooms had the capacity to
support opinions and encourage certain points without any fear of
reprimand. This is especially considering that they used pseudonyms, in
which case they would not be afraid of having to support individuals for
whom they were not particularly fond. Initially, I viewed this as
bullying, especially considering the prevalence of herd mentality, where
individuals would support one person en masse, without giving the
opponent a chance to explain their view (Wiederhold, 2012). In essence,
I used to take the side that had fewer supporters. Nevertheless, this
response has changed over time as I have to weigh the two sides and
determine the one that carries more weight. In essence, I take on a more
patient approach and carry out my research, supporting any side not
because of the numbers but because of the points for which it espouses.
The least favorite individual behavior that my fellow students display
in online classroom would, undoubtedly, be bullying. In some instances,
students can use nasty words especially against individuals that take on
a different position. This often results in a disengagement of the
discussions and can take it off course (Close, 2012).
The best individual behavior in online classes would essentially be
offering help in instances where a member does not have an idea of the
things under discussion. This often fosters unity and cooperation
amongst the students, which often results in a conducive environment and
relationship even in physical classrooms (Close, 2012).
References
Wiederhold, B.K (2012). Cyberpsychology Behavior and Social Networking.
London: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. publishers
Close, A (2012). Online Consumer Behavior: Theory and Research in Social
Media, Advertising, and E-tail. London: Routledge
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